MOHAMMAD FASAHAT

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

SAY IT LOUD - North Carolina Exhibitor

North Carolina Based Designer

Who or what inspires you professionally?

I am inspired and motivated by Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto and his way of redefining living spaces and interaction boundaries.

MOHAMMAD FASAHAT

Bio:

Mohammad Fasahat is a master of architecture student at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He holds a B. Arch from Tabriz Art University in Iran. He focuses on sustainability and social interaction in his artwork.

 

How did you first learn about architecture and when did you decide that built environment profession was an area of interest for you?

Esfahan, where I grew up, inspired me with the historical landmarks and elements which caught my attention. They always encouraged me and prompted my interest in learning about architecture.

What do you do?

Currently, I am a research assistant at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte.

What excites you in the work you do?

Seeing how others interact with the built environments that are designed and imagining how they can alter their daily lives.

Who or what inspires you professionally?

I am inspired and motivated by Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto and his way of redefining living spaces and interaction boundaries.

What is your proudest professional accomplishment or achievement?

One of my projects has been published in Villa magazine, and I have been nominated in several architectural competitions.

Featured Project Name: 

Tabriz Social Housing

 

Featured Project Location: 

Tabriz, Iran

 

Featured Project Completion Date: 

2018 spring

 

Role in Featured Project: 

Concept Design - Visualization - Research Studies - Planning

 

Featured Project Description:

Past few decades, apartments and skyscrapers have accounted the majority of urban settlement. In spite of dealing with overpopulation’s challenges, these types of high-rise buildings have forgotten the importance of their residents’ quality of life. But how is it possible to gather many residents in a residential complex with a focus on social spaces and providing private and semi-private spaces? What if we could translate the notion of old suburbs to a contemporary settlement?

Photography Credit:

Mohammad Fasahat