31392149-96aba386-7017-4d51-8f7a-0b35db013d10-1-Washington_DC_FBI_J._Edgar_Hoover_Building

KENNETH G. GROGGS

Groggs & Associates
African American AIA Fellow

SAY IT LOUD - Washington DC  Exhibitor
Illinois Based Designer 

Bio: 

His organizational efforts include the Council of Educational Facilities Planners, The Chicago Architectural Assistance Center, the Black Architects Collaborative, the Industrial Advisory Committee of Chicago and the Chicago Construction Coordinating Committee.

KENNETH G. GROGGS

Bio:

Kenneth Gene Groggs, FAIA was a NOMA founder and the first African American person to serve as Illinois State Architect. He was a member of AIA Chicago’s Board of Directors for in the late 70’s – early 80’s even serving as the Illinois Council Delegate. His service to NCARB began in 1976 as a regional grader for the design exam. He served in various capacities through the mid 80’s. Kenneth was a senior designer on many projects including the iconic FBI Headquarters in Washington D.C., Architect of Record – C.F. Murphy Associates. The Sloan Valve Building, Chicago Filtration Plant, Mercy Hospital and Chicago Civic Center are all also listed as part of his architectural achievements on his FAIA application. He was granted that recognition in 1984. In addition to NOMA, his organizational efforts include the Council of Educational Facilities Planners, The Chicago Architectural Assistance Center, the Black Architects Collaborative, the Industrial Advisory Committee of Chicago and the Chicago Construction Coordinating Committee. A native of Kansas, Mr. Groggs was president of Groggs & Associates, which he founded in 1983.

 

Year of Elevation: 

1984

Featured Project Name: 

J. Edgar Hoover F.B.I. Building

Featured Project Location: 

Washington, DC

Featured Project Completion Date: 

1974

Role in Featured Project: 

Senior Designer

Featured Project Description:

The FBI building, with its poured concrete exterior contrasts traditional stone government buildings. Featuring an open mezzanine and courtyard, most of the first floor is closed to facilitate security. Recessed panels along the ground floor were spaced to give the illusion of two-story columns, thus producing an arcade-like facade. Also for security reasons, no stores were included on the first floor. The main part of the building, facing E Street, retained the idea of a central core of files.

Photography Credit:

NOMA, Matt McClain/The Washington Post, Shutterstock