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EMANUEL KELLY

Kelly Maiello Architects
African American AIA Fellow

SAY IT LOUD - Washington DC  Exhibitor
Pennsylvania Based Designer 

Bio: 

Over the course of his many years in the city his firm has worked on a number of significant projects including the Pennsylvania Convention Center, the Philadelphia Criminal Justice Center, the renovation and preservation of Philadelphia City Hall and many others for local and state government, educational entities, and social service organizations.

EMANUEL KELLY

Bio:

Emanuel Kelly, FAIA, was raised in West Philadelphia and has been managing the design, documentation, and construction of architectural, urban design, and planning projects for thirty-six years. He graduated with a degree in architecture from Drexel University in 1971 and received his master’s degree in city planning and urban design from Harvard University in 1974. He returned to Philadelphia in 1976 and, along with Vincent Maiello, AIA, established the architectural and planning firm Kelly/Maiello, Inc. Over the course of his many years in the city his firm has worked on a number of significant projects including the Pennsylvania Convention Center, the Philadelphia Criminal Justice Center, the renovation and preservation of Philadelphia City Hall and many others for local and state government, educational entities, and social service organizations. In addition, his firm has taken a special interest in community revitalization and designing affordable housing for all residents.

 

Year of Elevation: 

2004

Featured Project Name: 

The President’s House, Freedom and Slavery in the Making of a New Nation

Featured Project Location: 

Philadelphia, PA

Featured Project Completion Date: 

2010

Role in Featured Project: 

Co-founder of design firm

Featured Project Description:

The President’s House commemorates the house at 6th and Market Streets where presidents George Washington and John Adams lived. It was here that they made decisions that shaped the executive branch of government. The design marks the footprint of the original building, such as entrance portal, fireplaces, ceremonial bay window and kitchen. It end with a glass enclosure through which visitors can view archaeological fragments of the original house that were discovered during site excavation.

Photography Credit:

Halkin | Mason Photography